Serving the Peninsula & Southside for 20+ Years

We Are Hiring.
See Our Careers Page »

What is Your Roof Design?

What is Your Roof Design?
Roofing

First and foremost, a roof is designed to protect the home from weather and hopefully with the least amount of maintenance as possible!  Of course, appearance is also important, however, take into consideration how that type of roof will perform throughout the seasons. This is where maintenance can become a huge factor, or not. Specific roof designs are better suited for certain regions.


  • Gable: Sometimes called a pitched or peaked roof, the gable style is one of the most popular roofs in the US and easily recognized by their triangular, inverted v, shape. Where they can easily shed water and snow and allow more ventilation, they can be problematic in high wind and hurricane areas, which are common in the Hampton Roads area.  If you choose a home with this style home, you want to be especially vigilant that the roof was constructed properly.  It is a simple design and can be built cheaper than other complex ones, however, if the frames do not have enough support, the entire roof can collapse.  Different Gable styles are the classic, crossed, front, Dutch, and gambrel.
  • Shed: This boxlike style, sometimes called a lean-to roof,  is identified by its single-slope in one direction. Shed roofs became popular in the 1970’s and 80’s used for houses, apartment complexes, vacation cottages, schools and small office buildings. After the 1980’s interest in this style diminished due to the extensive upkeep of the wooden exteriors.  
  • Hip: There are two ways to describe the hip roof style.  1) Sloping upward from all sides of a structure with no vertical ends and 2) all sides sloping gently downwards to the walls.  Both are basically saying the same thing. The most basic hip roof structure looks a pyramid-like shape on top of a house.  When other variations are included in the building plan, valleys start to take shape. Unlike the gable roof style, the hip roof tends to be more stable in hurricane regions, as long as there is a significant roof pitch that can cause the wind to stall and go over the roof to break up the effect. Carter’s Grove Plantation Home in Williamsburg is a historical hipped roof restored by The Roofing Company.   
  • Mansard: The French roof design popularized in the of the 17th century by architect Francois Mansart (1598-1666) has a nearly vertical roof that ties into another roof plane with two slopes on every side.  The mansard style can cost more to install and keep maintained, however it provides extra living space compared to other roof types.  A huge benefit is the box-like living space can easily be converted to a loft or an extra bedroom!  How about that!
  • Gambrel: This barn style roof is a variation of the mansard style, except that it has two sides, where the mansard has four. Many farm houses and log cabins have also adopted this style. Like the mansard, it offers extra space and the reason they are the choice for sheds and barns. Not an ideal style for areas with heavy winds or a lot of snowfall.
  • Flat: Yeah, just like it states...flat.  There is, however, a slight pitch in the ‘no pitch” flatness to allow water to drain off.  You’ll find this style more on commercial structures, however it can provide a significant amount of added outdoor living space on a residential home!  

By the descriptions above, is it obvious what type of roof you have on your home?  Perhaps it’s a combination of different styles.  If you aren’t sure, take a picture from the front of your home, post it on our facebook page, and let our roofing staff take a gander!  We are up for the challenge. Even if you want to show off the gorgeous rooftop you are so proud of, we’d love to see it!!

The Roofing Company 7-Point Satisfaction Guarantee

Learn what your Neighborhood Roofing Professional promises you...

The Roofing Company 7-Point Satisfaction Guarantee

Learn what your Neighborhood Roofing Professional promises you...

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions About TPO Roofing

Frequently Asked Questions About TPO Roofing

As fall starts, many homeowners are calling roofers in Chesapeake for roof inspection, repair, or replacement.

See More FAQs »